Live Webinar Recording #4

Live Webinar Recording #4

Parenting and Medical Cannabis

You will learn how parents, who themselves use medical marijuana, have further considerations as they help their kids understand these concepts. This webinar is co-hosted by Chanda Sinclair of the Portland Department of Substance Abuse Prevention and WCM’s Director of Education Becky DeKeuster. Join us for a lively discussion and a Q & A session, with helpful tips & tools for having honest, age-appropriate discussions with kids from toddlers to teens.

Presented by: Becky DeKeuster M. Ed. and Chanda Sinclair on October 1st, 2015 from 10am – 12pm.

Parenting and Medical Cannabis Text

  1. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine Parenting and Medical Cannabis Presenters: Becky DeKeuster, M.Ed, WCM Director of Education Chanda Sinclair, Community Health Promotion Specialist Portland, ME Public Health Division Producer: Ben Gelassen, WCM Marketing Associate Talking to Your Kids in a Changing World
  2. Legalized medical marijuana presents all adults with new opportunities to help children understand: – Why healthy kids should NOT use cannabis, and – Why some adults choose to use this plant therapeutically Parents who use therapeutic cannabis have further considerations to think about, as they help their children understand these issues and make healthy choices.
  3. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine What does the data tell us about youth use of & attitudes about marijuana?
  4. Source: Portland Public Health Substance Abuse Prevention Program, via the Public Health Program of the Opportunity Alliance. 2007-2013.
  5. Source: Portland Public Health Substance Abuse Prevention Program, via the Public Health Program of The Opportunity Alliance. 2007-2013. “The origin of this figure is indeed NIDA research first published in a 1994 article in the journal Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology…The survey was based on diagnostic definitions for cannabis dependence that were published in 1987 in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (3rd edition, revised) put out by the American Psychiatric Association. This manual has an inherent bias against non-problematic cannabis use and privileges the normalcy of alcohol use.”
  6. Source: www.medicalmarijuana.com Source: Portland Public Health Substance Abuse Prevention Program, via the Public Health Program of the Opportunity Alliance. 2007-2013.
  7. Source: Portland Public Health Substance Abuse Prevention Program, via the Public Health Program of the Opportunity Alliance. 2007-2013.
  8. Source: Portland Public Health Substance Abuse Prevention Program, via the Public Health Program of the Opportunity Alliance. 2007-2013.
  9. Sources: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/high-school-youth-trends; also http://news.utexas.edu/2015/07/13/marijuana-use-is-down-disapproval-is-up- among-young-teens (both accessed 9/29/15) Youth marijuana use stayed statistically stable in 2014, despite an increased number of states where medical or adult use cannabis is legal, and despite the fact that the number of youth who perceive marijuana use as harmful went down. Percent of students reporting use of cannabis in the past year. (University of Michigan, Monitoring the Future study 2014)
  10.  Source: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/high-school-youth-trends (accessed 9/29/15) Marijuana use continues to exceed cigarette use in all three grade levels. In 2014, 21.2 percent of high school seniors had used marijuana in the past 30 days, whereas only 13.6 percent had smoked cigarettes. Percent of students perceiving “great risk” from using cannabis. (University of Michigan, Monitoring the Future study 2014)
  11. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine I’m a parent who is also a certified medical cannabis patient. My use is responsible and therapeutic. What should I tell my children about this?
  12. 1. Keep it age-appropriate. (“Uncle Jerry’s garden”) 2. Be honest. (“Medicine for grown-ups”) 3. Emphasize that family health issues are private. 4. Be positive, calm and reassuring. Your attitude will transmit directly to your kids’ sensitive antennae. At any age…
  13. Think The brain isn’t fully developed until the mid-20s, and teens who smoke marijuana may be more likely to become dependent than those who begin use as adults.
  14. Secure Always keep medical cannabis in a safe and secure place away from children, pets, and guests. Store in odor-proof packaging, in a safe or lock box.
  15. Monitor Know how much you have and keep track of your medical cannabis.
  16. Talk early, talk often Conversation is often most effective before youth experiment with any substance.
  17. Tips for starting prevention early Limit Access Network Enforce Rules Communicate Often Be Up and Ready Tips for Starting Prevention Early Take advantage of everyday opportunities to have age-appropriate conversations. Talk to parents of your child’s friends.
  18. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine I’m a parent who is also a certified medical cannabis patient. Could my status as a patient affect my parental rights?
  19. CPS will respond to reports of child abuse or neglect, and may do a home inspection to determine whether to involve the courts. For more information, visit: http://www.safeaccessnow.org/ca_child_custody Medical cannabis and child custody CPS can temporarily remove your children, and may require things like parenting classes, drug counseling or ongoing drug testing. A spouse or former partner can use your medical cannabis use against you in a custody dispute.
  20. Keep the minimum amount that you need in your home. Lock medicine away from kids; child-proof any indoor cultivation area. If you cook with cannabis, clearly label infused products and store in child-proof containers. Responsible, conscientious use Do not medicate in the presence of your child. In dual-parent homes where both parents are patients, work to ensure one parent is capable of driving or responding to a crisis at any time.
  21. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine My child is already a tween or teen, and we haven’t had these talks. Isn’t it too late for us?
  22. As a parent of a teen, it can easily feel that you don’t matter anymore. Not true! Your children care what YOU think. They want to talk to YOU about important issues. They want YOU to keep connecting, no matter what. Parents, You Matter!
  23. As a parent of a teen, it can easily feel that you don’t matter anymore. Not true! • You matter because…. you can help your child avoid experimenting with substances. • You matter because… you can help your child get help if they need it. • You matter because… youth who learn about the risks from their parents are less likely to use drugs and alcohol Parents, You Matter!
  24. Youth are energetic, thoughtful, and idealistic, with a deep interest in what’s fair and right. Although the adult brain is much different than the adolescent brain, adolescents can make good decisions and differentiate between right and wrong. Remember that they may have a harder time making decisions in high-pressure social situations. This doesn’t mean they should not be held responsible for their actions.
  25. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine We Are Here to Help For more resources and information: Contact Chanda Sinclair at cls@portlandmaine.gov 207-874-8965 Visit www.maine.gov/dhhs/samhs/ Visit www.maineparents.net
  26. Delivery Methods and Dosing: Making the most of your medicine Thank you for your time and attention! Are there any questions?

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Parenting and Medical Cannabis